Friday, August 23, 2013

FFwD: Boulevard Raspail Corn on the Cob


Today´s recipe for the French Fridays with Dorie group is “Boulevard Raspail Corn on the Cob”.




Boulevard Raspail is a boulevard in Paris, France, it was named after François-Vincent Raspail (1794–1878), a French chemist, doctor and politician. Dorie apparently frequents the Sunday organic market there when she spends time in her apartment in Paris and during one of her shopping trips came across this recipe for cooking corn on the cob which calls for baking the ears of corn  for about forty minutes in the oven (turn once after twenty minutes) in order to achieve really delicious tasting corn.

Dorie notes in her recipe that “you do not see much corn on the cob in France” – well, the same holds true for Germany, while you can find two ears of corn that have already been chucked and wrapped or even sealed in plastic (mostly already pre-cooked), it is almost impossible to find corn in the husk around here. So the question quickly turned to "how do I solve this predicament" - after begging a farmer, I was proudly carrying a basket with about eight ears of corn home and could get started with this recipe. I certainly did not want to miss another one of the recipes, especially not this one.




While I placed six of my loot of eight on the grill, I prepared the remaining two ears of corn the way Dorie instructs – oven, twenty minutes, turn, another twenty minutes. Done. We liked both versions.

Dorie also mentions that there is more than one way to serve corn and so I decided to have a bit of fun with the baked kernels, cut them off the husk and prepared some summery appetizers for our guests. Love those tiny Weck jars. They are perfect for entertaining.




Appetizer with Boulevard Raspail Corn on the Cob

Ingredients for the Appetizer
  • 2 ears of corn in the husk
  • a few almonds (skins off) - I used the lovely Spanish Marcona almonds
  • some butter
  • two tbsp of local honey (organic if possible)
  • coarse sea salt (to taste)
  • freshly ground black pepper (to taste)
  • a few tbsp of Greek Yoghurt (I used about 250 grams)
  • fresh dill

Preparation of the Appetizer
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 200 degrees Celsius
  2. Place the unhusked ears of corn on the oven rack, roast for 20 minutes, turn, roast for another 20 minutes.
  3. Shuck the corn, let cool. Then cut the kernels off the cobs.
  4. While the corn is in the oven, heat a cast iron pan, melt the butter, add the honey and the sea salt and stir with a wooden spoon until everything has melted.
  5. Add the almonds and boil gently – do not stop stirring and do be careful - this is hot!
  6. After a few minutes, the almonds will be nicely coated, carefully place them on a parchment lined baking sheet and let cool. Once cool, coarsely chop and keep some whole.
  7. Stir some pepper and salt into the Greek yoghurt (to taste) and drop a spoonful in each Weck glass.
  8. Layer with fresh dill, yoghurt, corn kernels, chopped almonds. Serve cool or at room temperature.



While I liked a new way to prepare corn, I am not quite sure that I want to turn on the oven for about 40 minutes in summer to prepare corn this way, but, again, I always love to learn something new and I took the liberty (again) to play around with this recipe a bit. Considering the fact that the appetizers were well-received and the time it took to find a few ears of corn in the husk, I do not think that Dorie would mind.

If you are interested in more Boulevard Raspail Corn on the Cob as it was prepared and interpreted by my fellow members of the French Fridays with Dorie group, please click here.




48 comments:

  1. Your take on this simple recipe Andrea is absolutely unique and fantastic! LOVE the flavors you mixed up, with the honey and dill!

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    1. Paula, I appreciate your kind comment - these appetizers were nice and fresh, even the kids loved them - the bit of chopped honeyed almonds is really nice together with the tartness of the yoghurt and the distinct taste of the dill.

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  2. OMG Andrea, that summer appetiser just looks so lovely. And I'm with Paula, what an interesting combination you have there with the honey and dill.

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    1. Thank you very much - the combination does indeed work and once the corn is cooked properly, the appetizer is done in no time.

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  3. Hi Andrea! Why doesn't it surprise me that you tracked down a farmer and begged for fresh corn on the cob? It was worth it. Those appetizers are absolutely gorgeous. Weck jars are so elegant looking. I've never seen that little size, but love it. It's easy for me to find freshly picked corn right now, so I'll try out your appetizer next week. Have a great weekend!

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    1. Betsy, I will tell the farmer that you gave me the idea to ask him to sell his corn in the future to me and many more interested compatriots of mine. Not an easy task to talk to a German farmer though...but since most the peolple around here think that I am kind of weird and/obsessed when it comes to the freshness of products, I guess it will not really make much of a difference what he thinks...seriously, thank you for your kind comment, dear Betsy, hope all is well - although I am sure it is as I have seen a few pictures of you on FB and you looked so very happy in all of them!

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  4. Ganz toll! I really love using the Weck jars, as they are perfect for what the French call "verrines!" I am sure roasting is a good way to do this but your method of grilling sounds great. Your recipe would work beautifully even with steamed corn, which is the way we always ate corn when I was growing up. On Monday, for my birthday, I am making a lobster, corn, mango and basil salad... This is the perfect time of year for corn - maybe our farmer fried will start selling it directly to you and others now. Tchuß! David

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    1. David, "verrine", of course, they are called like this in France the little appetizers/foods served in pretty glass vessels - it did slip my mind for a brief moment there because my dear compatriots are crazy nuts about serving their appetizers in WECK jars of all shapes and sizes these days - thanks for the wonderful comment and for the little reminder, next time, I will mention that in my "verrine" post!

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  5. Andrea,
    I LOVE love love this little creative appetizer! Xxx

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    1. Kim, THANK YOU so much - love all your comments!

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    1. Colette, aren´t these small WECK jars adorable - but I have even smaller ones than these, but a bit too small for appetizers or "verrine" as the French say and as David so aptly pointed out. Thanks Colette for the nice comment and thanks David for reminding me that the French are crazy about these "verrine" or food served in samll glass vessels.

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  7. Love the appetizer a great way to serve corn.

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    1. Geraldine, so nice that you like this way of preparing Dorie´s Boulevard Raspail Corn.

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    1. Marion, thank you very much - Dank U wel! Hope all is well in the Netherlands and so very nice to "see" you here!
      Met vriendelijke groet,
      Andrea

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  9. Love your Weck jars! I found some last spring in a Williams Sonoma. You always make them look so delightful! How great to find a farmer who was willing to part with some of his corn. Your take on this recipe is absolutely lovely and looks delicious! A perfect appetizer! You are so very creative, Andrea!

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    1. Kathy, hope the WECK jars sell for a reasonable prize at these wonderful Williams Sonoma stores and I hope that they sell different sizes and shapes like the "tulip" shape, my favorite! And thank you also for the wonderful comment, dear Kathy!

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  10. I just adore corn on the cob - it just says summer to me. I did not know one does not see much of it in Europe.I must confess, I have never roasted it. I have certainly cooked it in its husk on the grill. We do that often. Growing up, my mom always removed the husks and subjected the ears to a goodly boiling session. I, like you, do not relish the idea of turning on the oven when it is so very hot. That's for certain. I love your little appetizer in the Weck jars. They look so cute. What a great idea.

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    1. Adri, you know that method of cooking the corn in the husk on the grill that you mentioned - I wlove preparing corn that way I realized and will keep doing that as lond as my source will provide some more lovely fresh corn in the husk this (late) summer - thank you for all your support, dear Adri.
      Grazie mille per i complimenti, sei molto gentile!
      Cari saluti!

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  11. Those Weck jars are so lovely! Great way to take this simple recipe to an elegant conclusion.

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    1. Teresa, glad you enjoy my very persoanl take on Dorie´s recipe for Boulevard Raspail Corn.

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  12. Your appetizer looks lovely. And I had no idea corn on the cob would be so hard to find in Germany. It's available everywhere here, and I grew up on a farm that grew corn, so I'm used to having it in abundance. I'm so glad you were able to find some to try this recipe!

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    1. Beth, corn is not hard to find in Germany but it is corn that is used for feeding the cattle it tastes tough and mealy and the corn that is sold in stores or at the market is either already chucked and/or pre-cooked - we just do not have the tradition of eating corn here other than from a can. But now I have found a reliable source and I am a happy fresh corn eater once again - as long as the season lasts.

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  13. Wow, Andrea. You really did come up with a unique take on this week's recipe (and I am impressed that you went through so much trouble to get the corn ears).

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    1. Cher, trouble is one thing, missing too many recipes another - I just did not want to miss out on this recipe since I have alreday missed a few and I do love the taste of fresh summer corn.

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  14. Andrea this is so gorgeous, I want to reach out and grab one to snack on! What a great twist on the corn.

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    1. Christy, thank you very much - appreciate the wonderful comment. Corn is just so very versatile and I felt a little under-whelmed that day.

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  15. Wow, didn't know fresh corn on the cobs are not available everywhere. My family adores corns and I get them all the time. Next time I buy them, the feeling won't be the same. We're so lucky to get the fresh produces and should take things for granted. Thanks for sharing this lovely recipe. Can't wait to try it out.

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    1. Amy, while corn is grown abundantely around here, it is used for feeding cattle and not humans really - while you can find corn that is destined for the table, not the barn, it is almost always without the husk and often even pre-cooked.

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  16. Your appetizer version looks terrific, Andrea! I love those Weck jars, too!!

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    1. Liz, thanks so much - I saw that you prepared corn in many different ways as well - isn´t it nice to play around with some different flavor combinations?!

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  17. What a neat appetizer idea. Corn is very plentiful here, of course, and I have been buying it often. I cook it all and then have been cutting it off the cobb and throwing it in salads. I will reserve some the next time to try this. I am curious about the taste. I agree with you about turning on the oven - either the grill or boiling sugar water is fine with me.I agree with Liz - love the Weck jars.

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    1. Mary, thanks of rthe comment - I do know about the fact that corn is a staple in the US and Canada - I have eaten and prepared it more times than I can count, but around here it is still mostly grown for feeding animals and only a fraction of the corn grown is meant for the table.

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  18. This looks delicious Andrea, and I loved reading about your determination in getting that corn! We have A LOT of corn here. I'm eager to try this! Thank you for sharing! I'm hosting a giveaway on my blog tomorrow for one of Ryan's necklaces, and I'd love for you to stop by! I hope you are having a wonderful Sunday!

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    1. Monet, glad you approve of my interpretation - determination seems to be the only way sometimes...I will definitely stop byyour blog later today - "see" you then!

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  19. wow!never thought to combine our favorite corn so beautifully with almonds,honey and Greek yogurt....awesome dish,terrific flavors,thanks for sharing....HAVE A WONDERFUL DAY!!!:-)

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    1. Kumar, thanks for the lovely comment - if we can get our hands on some more fresh corn, I will make this again as the taste testers of mine really liked the combination of flavors.

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  20. fresh corn i love to have it... yummy!

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    1. Thank you very much - fresh corn is indeed quite a treat, no matter which way you serve it!

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  21. What a lovely way to use the corn...it sounds like a perfect summer appetizer and worth you effort in obtaining the corn. :)

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    1. Karen, thank you - the things we do to get the freshset of ingredients - sometimes I do feel a little weird but in the end it was often worth the extra mile.

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  22. As usual you impressed me immensely with your enjoyable and informative post. Even having visited the Blvd - I had no idea about it's namesake until I read your post ! And that appetizer ?? YES PLEASE!!! Stunning as usual, along with the photography. And you get 5 gold stars for tracking down a farmer to get that corn. Ps - I love Weck jars too and now want to get some little ones :)

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    1. Tricia, thanks so much for the fabulous comment - it always makes my day reading them and I truly appreciate your support! These miny Weck jars are all the rage around here and I do love their verstility and the way they look - just perfcet for serving little appetizers such as tartare or salads or even a bit os oup - I believe Williams Sonoma carries the small ones and they are probably also available at amazon. Thanks for taking the time and reading through my post and leaving such a wonderful comment!

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  23. I want those weck jars! Your appetizer looks and sounds excellent. I'm so impressed that you begged a farmer to get the corn...I've always been enjoying reading your River Cottage Veg Everyday series. One more book to add to my long cookbooks wish list!

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    1. Jora, if I could I would send you some of mine, I believe I own way too many Weck jars and bottles of all shapes and sizesou enjoy reading my River Cottage Veg Everyday series - and yes, please get the book, I would really enjoy some cooking company!

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  24. When I shared the grilled corn recipe (corn on the cob), some readers told me you don't get those in Europe. And you asked the farmer! LOL. I love your enthusiasm! In fact, thsi dish looks so delicious and I like how they are served in a cute little jar!

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    1. Nami, you are such a wonderful and kind commentators - trust me, we do get corn in Europe, maybe not in the husk but you can find some - especially when you ask a happy and friendly German farmer (Ha!).

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